CNN’s Cuomo Politicizes Alex Trebek’s Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis

America had a heavy heart on Wednesday after we all learned that Jeopardy host Alex Trebek was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. But instead of just promoting Trebek’s fighting spirit and spreading awareness for a type of cancer that’s really hard to detect, CNN’s Chris Cuomo had to throw in a dash of politics and veiled references to President Trump. And naturally, he also used the news to promote CNN’s empty slogan.

There was a hint of a political message when Cuomo began the segment near the end of the first hour of Prime Time. “In a time that is all about what is keeping us apart, we got tough news today about someone who has always brought America together, literally for decades,” he began.

“I don’t care what your race, color, creed, gender, bank account level. You’ve watched Jeopardy. Since 1984, Alex Trebek has been the smartest guy in our living rooms, teaching us, more importantly bringing us together,” he continued.

But things got more overtly political as Cuomo was wrapping up the segment:

Trebek is a major asset to our culture, not just to the game show. In a time of shallow beliefs and rampant truth abuse in our politics and beyond, every night he makes facts first. We need him now more than ever. So, Mr. Trebek, fight as you have never fought before. Do everything you can, and please know you are respected for all the right reasons by all of us. We are with you, and we wish you well.

In a time of shallow beliefs and rampant truth abuse in our politics and beyond, every night he makes facts first.” Seriously? Now, of all times?

Cuomo treats his show as a prosecutor’s argument and courtroom against President Trump. Seemingly every night, Cuomo uses his show to rail against the President with suggestions he’s tearing us apart and poisoning the dialogue with lies and misinformation. So, given that blatant history, it’s clear that Cuomo exploiting Trebek’s cancer diagnosis to score political points.

Now, Cuomo has a history keeping nothing sacred and away from politics. Last Thanksgiving, he declared the country was celebrating during a time of great “illness” and “depredation” in the same vein as what the Pilgrims went through, the Civil War, the Great Depression, and Pearl Harbor.

But to be fair, and because this author lost his grandmother to pancreatic cancer, Cuomo did take time to raise awareness:

I will tell you the American Cancer Society estimates that for 2019, about 57,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed. Pancreatic cancer accounts for about three percent of all cancers in the U.S., about 7 percent of all cancer deaths. It’s a bad one. You know, stage four is what it sounds like. Part of the awareness is not just the numbers but the urgency.

We should be getting regular checkups, you should stay close to your medical care. Be proactive. Pancreatic cancer is hard to find early. The pancreas, as an organ, is deep inside the body. Early tumors are tough to see, tough to feel for doctors during routine physicals. People usually don’t have symptoms until the cancer has already spread. So, you’ve got to be proactive, and you’ve got to be lucky frankly.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read:

CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time
March 6, 2019
9:57:51 p.m. Eastern

CHRIS CUOMO: In a time that is all about what is keeping us apart, we got tough news today about someone who has always brought America together, literally for decades. I don’t care what your race, color, creed, gender, bank account level. You’ve watched Jeopardy. Since 1984, Alex Trebek has been the smartest guy in our living rooms, teaching us, more importantly bringing us together. Today, he gave us the toughest answer we’ve ever gotten from him.

ALEX TREBEK: Just like 50,000 other people in the United States each year, this week I was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. Now, normally the prognosis for this is not very encouraging, but I’m going to fight this, and I’m going to keep working. And with the love and support of my family and friends and with the help of your prayers also, I plan to beat the low survival rate statistics for this disease. Truth told, I have to because under the terms of my contract, I have to host Jeopardy for three more years. So help me keep the faith, and we’ll win. We’ll get it done.

CUOMO: That signature insouciance. He’s always so even, even now. Trebek, 78 years young. He went public because he wants to raise awareness in part. So let’s do that.

I will tell you the American Cancer Society estimates that for 2019, about 57,000 people in the United States will be diagnosed. Pancreatic cancer accounts for about three percent of all cancers in the U.S., about 7 percent of all cancer deaths. It’s a bad one. You know, stage four is what it sounds like. Part of the awareness is not just the numbers but the urgency.

We should be getting regular checkups, you should stay close to your medical care. Be proactive. Pancreatic cancer is hard to find early. The pancreas, as an organ, is deep inside the body. Early tumors are tough to see, tough to feel for doctors during routine physicals. People usually don’t have symptoms until the cancer has already spread. So, you’ve got to be proactive, and you’ve got to be lucky frankly.

Trebek is a major asset to our culture, not just to the game show. In a time of shallow beliefs and rampant truth abuse in our politics and beyond, every night he makes facts first. We need him now more than ever. So, Mr. Trebek, fight as you have never fought before. Do everything you can, and please know you are respected for all the right reasons by all of us. We are with you, and we wish you well.

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